HomeInfrastructureBusy fortnight for Transpennine Route Upgrade

Busy fortnight for Transpennine Route Upgrade

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Work on the Transpennine Route Upgrade (TRU) is due to get into its stride next month with a two-week, round-the-clock programme of improvements taking place between Manchester Victoria and Rochdale and Manchester Victoria and Stalybridge during the period Saturday 31 July – Sunday 15 August 2021.

The majority of passengers will be kept on the move by diverting trains onto different railway lines between Yorkshire and Manchester, though some journeys may need to be completed partly by bus, primarily between Rochdale and Manchester Victoria.

Stretching across the North of England between York and Manchester, via Leeds and Huddersfield, the 76-mile Transpennine railway serves 23 stations, crosses over and dips under 285 bridges and viaducts, passes through six miles of tunnels, and crosses over 29 level crossings.

Map of Transpennine route (click to enlarge).

TRU will transform this line into a high-performing, reliable railway for passengers with greater punctuality, more trains and improved journey times. The scale of the project means that there will be planned disruption to train services to enable work to be carried out, but we are committed to keeping passengers moving on a train as often as possible, on time and in comfort as a key priority.

In July 2020, the government announced £589 million of funding to kickstart the programme. A further £317 million investment was announced last month, totalling £906 million.

The work this summer is being delivered by the TRU West Alliance, which includes Network Rail, Arup, BAM Nuttall and Amey.

Neil Holm, Network Rail.

Neil Holm, Network Rail’s Transpennine Route Upgrade director, said: “Our improvement work in Greater Manchester, starting next month, is a key part of the Transpennine Route Upgrade.

“During this complex upgrade, we’ll be demolishing ageing railway bridges to install new ones and upgrading track. This work is crucial to enable us to run more trains and faster trains in future as part of the wider TRU programme.

“Though we can’t keep these railway lines open through Manchester Victoria while we do this, we’ve created diversionary routes so passengers can still get in and out of Manchester by train as much as possible.”

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