HomeBusinessAlstom to supply Italy’s first hydrogen trains

Alstom to supply Italy’s first hydrogen trains

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Alstom is to supply six hydrogen-powered trains to Italy under a contract signed with FNM (Ferrovie Nord Milano), the main transport and mobility group in the Italian region of Lombardy.

The €160 million deal includes an option for a further eight trains. The first train is expected to be delivered mid-2022.

Unlike earlier Alstom hydrogen trains, which were based on the Lint platform, the new hydrogen trains for FNM will be based on Alstom’s Coradia Stream regional train platform, which is already being produced by Alstom’s main Italian sites.

FNM’s hydrogen-powered Coradia Stream for FNM, which will use the fuel-cell propulsion technology that was developed for the Coradia iLint, will maintain the same high standards of comfort as the electric version and will match the operational performance of diesel trains, including their range.

Gian Luca Erbacci, Alstom.

Gian Luca Erbacci, senior vice president of Alstom Europe, commented: “We are immensely proud to be introducing hydrogen train technology to Italy, and we recognise the trust placed in us by our Italian customer.

“This development confirms Alstom’s role in defining the future of mobility. These trains, together with the Coradia iLint that have already proven themselves in commercial service in Germany, represent another major step in the transition towards global sustainable transport systems.

“I take this opportunity to congratulate FNM for demonstrating that they are a leader in this area.”

Alstom’s Coradia iLint, the world’s first passenger train powered by a hydrogen fuel cell, has run passenger services in Germany and been tested in both Austria and the Netherlands. Its hydrogen fuel cell produces electricity, which is then used for traction in the conventional way. The fuel cells also charge batteries which can give extra power when needed and act as an energy store for the regenerative braking system.

The only waste product from the fuel cell is water vapour and the unit is also far quieter than an equivalent diesel engine. Specifically designed for operation on non-electrified lines, the iLint offers clean, sustainable train operation with high levels of performance.

Coradia Stream trains for FNM are manufactured by Alstom in Italy with the project development, most of the manufacturing and certification performed at its site in Savigliano. Design and manufacturing of the traction systems and other components is carried out at Sesto San Giovanni, while the on-board signalling systems are delivered by the company’s site in Bologna.

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