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Future role of stations explored in new report

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Railway stations, both large and small, will need to evolve in the future as the role they play in towns and cities changes, according to a report published by Network Rail and engineering consultant Arup.

Tomorrow’s Living Station’ sets out a way of thinking on how stations large and small might need to evolve to keep up with the pace of change and meet the needs of tomorrow’s passengers. It examines the future role of stations:

  • As the centre of movement for people
  • As drivers for inclusive and sustainable growth
  • At the heart of healthy communities

Network Rail and Arup took advice from senior industry figures to produce the document, which they hope will act as a blueprint for future discussions around stations across Britain.

Launching the new report, Network Rail Property managing director David Biggs said: “Our world is changing. As traditional boundaries of space and place blur, increasing urbanisation and new technology is transforming the way we live, work and play.

David Biggs, Network Rail.

“The impact stations can have in this shift is significant, and now more than ever we need to consider the future role of them as a catalyst for creating healthy and sustainable communities and delivering positive outcomes for passengers.

“‘Tomorrow’s Living Station’ is a concept we are proud to champion, and we believe that by being bold and thinking differently, it could realise a new and exciting chapter for the future growth and prosperity of Great Britain.”

Malcolm Smith, Arup.

Arup’s leader in Integrated City Planning, Malcolm Smith, added: “We are delighted to have collaborated with Network Rail to develop ‘Tomorrow’s Living Station’, to explore how stations might develop and to make them a place of inspiration and pride. This report sets out a way of thinking that incorporates the fundamental role of stations and railways in moving people safely but explores broader issues and opportunities for stations.

“Rather than being a one-size-fits-all approach, we hope this document will help everyone involved in shaping the future of our stations to come up with their own specific ideas appropriate to the relevant station context.”

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